Sarah Morley (1825–1882)

SARAH MORLEY was born SARAH WATSON in England to farm labourer parents JOHN WATSON and SARAH WATSON (née SARAH CATT). She was the eldest of four daughters, with HARRIET, HANNAH and ELIZABETH born after her. The WATSONS sailed to the Colony of New South Wales as free immigrants per Palmyra (1838), but baby ELIZABETH died at sea during the journey. Unfortunately, SARAH’s mother also died the following year. SARAH the younger went on to have a child out of wedlock in 1844, who she named SARAH ELIZABETH WATSON. She married twice after that; first to ROBERT WITHAM, with whom she had four children, second to SAMUEL MORLEY with whom she had another four children. She died on 7 October 1882, aged 56, and was buried at St. John’s Cemetery.

Names

  • Birth name: SARAH WATSON
  • Alternate: SARAH ANN WATSON
  • Married name: SARAH WITHAM
  • Married name: SARAH MORLEY
  • Alternate: SARAH ANN MORLEY

Burial Location

  • Section 1, Row B, No. 20, St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta

Relationships

  • Daughter of JOHN WATSON
  • Daughter of SARAH WATSON (née SARAH CATT)
  • Sister of HARRIET WATSON
  • Sister of HANNAH WATSON
  • Sister of ELIZABETH WATSON
  • Sister-in-law of JOHN HOLLAND
  • Mother of SARAH ELIZABETH WATSON
  • Wife of ROBERT WITHAM
  • Mother of JOHN WITHAM
  • Mother of ELIZA JANE WITHAM
  • Mother of HANNAH WITHAM
  • Mother of HARRIET ANNIE WITHAM
  • Wife of SAMUEL MORLEY
  • Mother of SAMUEL HENRY MORLEY
  • Mother of CHARLES J MORLEY
  • Mother of EMILY CLARA MORLEY
  • Mother of ALICE ADA MORLEY

Related Content

THE HOLLANDS: GUNS ‘N’ TUBEROSES

By Michaela Ann Cameron

Abstract: Jack was very in tune with nature. He had seven stars, a sun, a half moon & a flowerpot tattooed on the inside of his arm from his younger days, woke with the birds, took his morning’s walk to Camellia to admire the camellias of Sir William Macarthur’s former gardener & nurseryman, & lovingly tended a few ‘pet plants’ of his own. But every man has his limits. Jack was not a cat person. Indeed, his extreme devotion to his greenery was precisely what precluded even so much as a begrudging acceptance that he must coexist with felinity, all because the neighbouring cats had a terrible habit of scratching up his blooming beauties. One morning, around seven o’clock, Jack found one of his tuberoses ‘smashed.’ ‘There he stood at [his] front door’ of The Star Inn, ‘with the broken flower in one hand, & a double-barrelled gun in the other,’ showing a friend his ‘broken treasure’ & ‘vowing vengeance on the tomcat that had wrought the mischief.’ Spying at that very moment ‘the delinquent cat—or a cat’—Jack took off after it, aimed, & “Bang!”: he blew that cat right out of existence. It was not the first time the Parramatta publican of The Star Inn had shown such extreme inconsistency in his regard for living things. In fact, you could say John ‘Jack’ Holland had more or less lived his whole life with a flower in one hand, & a shotgun in the other. Read more>>

Lists

# English

# Immigrant

# Came Free

# Ship: Palmyra (1838)

# Burial year: 1882

# Grave: marked