Samuel Marsden (1765–1838)

REVEREND SAMUEL MARSDEN, was an Anglican chaplain, missionary, magistrate, and farmer. He arrived in the colony with his wife ELIZABETH MARSDEN and newborn daughter ANNE MARSDEN per William (1794) to serve as assistant to the chaplain REVEREND RICHARD JOHNSON. SAMUEL MARSDEN was soon stationed at Parramatta and, despite being the only Anglican minister on the mainland, was not formally promoted to Chief Cleric of the Colony of New South Wales until 1810. He remains a controversial figure, popularly known as ‘The Flogging Parson’ by many Australians yet revered as ‘Te Mātenga’ (The Leader) and founder of the Christian faith in Aotearoa (New Zealand). He was farewelled with an impressively grand public funeral and buried at St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta.

Burial Location

  • Section 1, Row U, No. 3, St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta.

Relationships

  • Son of THOMAS MARSDEN
  • Son of BATHSHEBA BROWN
  • Husband of ELIZABETH MARSDEN née FRISTAN
  • Father of ANNE HASSALL née MARSDEN
  • Father of CHARLES SAMUEL MARSDEN
  • Father of ELIZABETH MARY BOBART née MARSDEN
  • Father of JOHN MARSDEN
  • Father of CHARLES SIMEON MARSDEN
  • Father of MARY BETTS née MARSDEN
  • Father of JANE CATHERINE MARSDEN
  • Father of MARTHA BETTS née MARSDEN
  • Father-in-law of REVEREND THOMAS HASSALL
  • Father-in-law of REVEREND H. H. BOBART
  • Father-in-law of THOMAS MARSDEN, Esquire
  • Father-in-law of JOHN BETTS
  • Father-in-law of JOSIAH ALLEN BETTS
  • Father-in-law of ELIZABETH HOWARD MARSDEN née BRABYN
  • Grandfather of SIDNEY THOMAS MARSDEN (died at the Parsonage, 1835)
  • Grandfather of JAMES S. HASSALL

Related Content

SAMUEL MARSDEN: A CONTESTED LIFE (2020)

By Matthew Allen

Abstract: His supporters have remembered him as a moral and saintly evangelical pioneer; his enemies have recalled a greedy and hypocritical ‘flogging-parson.’ Between these two conflicting visions the real Samuel Marsden has almost disappeared. But how did Marsden’s violently contested reputation develop over time? By exploring the key controversies and judgements which contributed to it, both during his life and since his death, we discover that Marsden’s reputation has been extensively shaped by anachronism—judging his actions by standards that did not exist when he acted—and that Marsden was a more complex and interesting figure than either of the dominant visions have allowed. Read more>>

LOST LANDMARK: ST. JOHN’S PARSONAGE (2020)

By Michaela Ann Cameron

Abstract: Lost Landmark tells the story of how our Francis Greenway-designed Georgian Parsonage became a pile of Edwardian rubble. Despite its untimely demise, or that few now even know that a building so commanding ever existed on the crown of the southern ridge, St. John’s Parsonage, Parramatta occupies as prominent a place in our history as it once did in the town. In this publication, therefore, I take the parsonage building itself as my biographical subject, detailing its birth as a Georgian Parsonage, its rebirth as a Victorian Private Mansion and Ladies’ College, and its premature death in the Edwardian era, whilst also highlighting the various characters who were responsible for its creation and destruction, as well as the many and diverse people whose lives played out within the walls of this historic home and ‘lost landmark.’ Read more>>

ELIZABETH LAWRY: LITTLE BABE (2020)

By Elizabeth de Réland

Abstract: In July 1820, many within Australia’s geographically isolated and therefore immunologically naïve indigenous and settler communities were ‘consigned to the grave in a few days’ when influenza finally reached the continent for the first time and acted with speed against the very young, the elderly and the chronically ill. Mere weeks after influenza made its colonial debut, the heavily pregnant Mary Lawry became one of the multitudes infected, her ‘prevailing cough’ sending her into premature labour with her ‘little babe’ Elizabeth. Thus, through the story of ‘little babe,’ the child of Wesleyan missionaries the Lawrys and the grandchild of artisan missionaries the Hassalls, we are able to peer into one Parramatta family’s harrowing experience of the 1820 influenza epidemic—their triple tragedy representative of the immense human loss suffered by so many others within their local community and beyond, who proved equally helpless to stop the spread of the illness or its fatal consequences. Read more>>

REVEREND SAMUEL MARSDEN also features, albeit less centrally, in the following essays:

Multimedia

Lists

# Came Free

# Ship: William (1794)

# Missionary

# Chaplain

# Magistrate

# Factory Above the Gaol

# Parramatta Female Factory

# St. John’s Parsonage, Parramatta

# Rangihou

# Burial Year: 1838

# Grave: marked